A Developer’s Story on How Eucalyptus Saved the Day

by kyolee310

This is a short story on how a UI developer at Eucalyptus was able to use Eucalyptus to save his time on development of Eucalyptus.

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The agenda of the day is to set up Travis CI for the latest Eucalyptus user console, Koala. Quoted from Wikipedia, “Travis CI is a hosted, distributed continuous integration service used to build and test projects hosted at GitHub.” In other words, we want to set up an automated service hook on Koala’s GitHub repository so that whenever developers commit new code, “auto-magic” takes places somewhere in the Internet, which ensures that the developers did not screw things up by mistake, which, in turn, allows us developers to sit back and enjoy a warm cup of “post-commit-victory” tea while our thoughts are drifting away on the sea of Reddit.

But, before arriving at such Utopia, first things first. Must read the instructions on Travis CI.

Luckily, Travis CI put together a nice and comforting set of documentations on how to hook a project on Travis CI (http://about.travis-ci.org/docs/user/getting-started/) as well as its impressive, pain-free registration interface. Things are as easy as clicking buttons for the first few steps so far.

And, of course, nothing ever comes that easy. Now I am looking at the part where I need to create the XML configuration file for Koala’s build procedures. Done with the button-clicking. Time to put down the cup of tea because now I got some reading and thinking to do.

A few minutes after, I am stunned by the line below:

“Travis CI virtual machines are based on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server Edition 64 bit.”

Oh, bummer.

The main development platform for Koala has been on CentOS 6, meaning Koala’s build dependencies and scripts have been targeted toward running on CentOS 6 environment. It means that I need to go over the build procedures and dependency setting so that Koala can be built and tested on Ubuntu 12.04. But, first, where do I find those Ubuntu machines?

Then, the realization, ‘Wait a second here. I have Eucalyptus.’

I open up a browser and log into the Eucalyptus system for which I have been using as backend to develop Koala. I launch a couple of Ubuntu 12.04 instances. Within a minute, I have 2 fresh instances of Ubuntu 12.04 virtual machines up and running.

Immediately I log in to the first instance and start installing Koala to validate the build procedures on Ubuntu 12.04 environment. Along the way, I discover various little issues in this new environment and tweak things around to fine-tune Koala’s build procedures. Once felt ready, I log into the other Ubuntu instance to verify the newly adjusted build procedures under its fresh setting. More mistakes and issues are captured, and more adjustments are made. Meanwhile, the first instance has been shut down and a new Ubuntu instance has been brought up. With this new instance, I am able to rinse and repeat the validation of the build procedures. Of course, there are some mistakes again. They get fixed and adjusted. Meanwhile, another instance goes down and comes up fresh.

The juggling of the instances lasts a couple more times until the build procedures are perfected. Now I am confident that Koala will build successfully on Ubuntu 12.04 environment. Commit the new build XML script to GitHub. It’s time for the warm cup of “post-commit-victory” tea.

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