Beyond Continuous Integration: Locking Steps with Dev, QA, and Release

by kyolee310

Continuous integration: the practice of frequently integrating one’s new or changed code with the existing code repository [wikipedia]

In this blog we will talk about how the continuous integration process was put in place for the new component, Eucalyptus User Console, in order to collaborate the efforts among the dev, QA and release teams throughout the development cycle of Eucalyptus 3.2.

Backgrounduserconsoleconponentview

Eucalyptus User Console is a newly introduced component in Eucalyptus, whose main goal is to provide an easy-to-use, intuitive browser-based interface to the cloud users, thus assisting in the dev/test cloud deployments among IT organizations and enterprises. Eucalyptus User Console consists of two components: javascript-based client-side application and Tornado-based user console proxy server.

Early Involvement

The first phase of the development was to come up with a quick prototype to demonstrate how the user console would work under the given initial design of the architecture (see the Eucalyptus Console components layout diagram above). As soon as the prototype was evaluated and its feasibility was verified, the release team started creating the packages for two major Linux OS platforms: Ubuntu and Centos/RHEL.

The early involvement of the release team turned out to be the best help any developers or QA engineers could ask for; since the very beginning stage of the development, the release team was able to provide invaluable information that served as guardrail for the fast-moving development. Such information included advising on how the files should be named and organized and identifying which dependencies should or should not be used in order to meet the requirements for various Linux distributions. Dealing with such issues at the later stage of the development would have been undoubtedly a major pain in the back-end.

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Further more, the release team was able to ensure that the development of the new user console would never go off the track against the Linux distro requirements by setting up the automated daily package-building process using Jenkins — which utilizes the VM resources from our Release cloud that runs on Eucalyptus.

Keeping Up With Eucalyptus

Setting up the automated process to build the packages would allow the release team to keep an eye on the progress of the user console’s development in terms of the ability to build the packages according to the constraints set by the Linux distributions. However, it would not guarantee whether the newly built packages contain the version of the user console that works with the current, up-to-date Eucalyptus cloud that was also in development.

Thus, the challenge was to ensure that the latest built user console packages work with the latest built Eucalyptus throughout the development.

In order to solve this issue, the QA team created a testunit that automatically installs the latest user console packages on a newly built Eucalyptus. Then, the testunit was added to the main test sequences used by the Eucalyptus 3.2 development in our automated QA system, making the installation of the latest user console packages accessible by all developers at Eucalyptus.

This setup encouraged a failure in the user console package installation to be seen by any developers throughout the development, thus allowing the failure to be detected fast and reported with quickness.

Screen shot 2012-12-10 at 5.50.02 AM

The testunit ui_setup can be seen in action above in the table which displays the results of the test sequence ran by the automated QA system.. Check out the link below for more details of this testunit:

https://github.com/eucalyptus-qa/ui_setup

Circle of Trust

As the user console evolved out of its prototype state and took the form of a more product-like shape, the QA team was working in parallel, figuring out how to set up the automated testing process for the user console. The blog here talks in detail about how Selenium was used to create the automated web-browser testing tools, se34euca.

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In the mid-stage of the development, as the features of the user console started functioning in reasonably stable manners, 3 automated tests were added — incrementally — to ensure that the working state of the user console throughout the development.

Screen shot 2012-12-10 at 6.41.28 AMThose 3 tests are:

  1. user_console_view_page_testhttps://github.com/eucalyptus-qa/user_console_view_page_test
  2. user_console_generate_keypair_testhttps://github.com/eucalyptus-qa/user_console_generate_keypair_test
  3. user_console_launch_instance_test - https://github.com/eucalyptus-qa/user_console_launch_instance_test

These automated tests were to ask the 3 simple questions below on a daily basis:

  1. Can the user log in and see all the landing pages on the latest user console?
  2. Can the user generate a new keypair using the latest user console?
  3. Can the user launch a VM instance using the latest user console?

Of course, it would be possible, and desirable, to ask more questions in a more complicated fashion. However, during the rapid development phase, asking those 3 simple questions on a daily basis, turned out to be sufficient, and effective, to understand whether something terrible had happened to the user console or not.

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The goal of these automated tests at this stage of the development was not to detect every little defect in the product. Not too soon at the moment.

The main purpose is rather to serve as an indicator for the developers, QA engineers, and release engineers to assure ourselves that the change that went in the code earlier today did not ruin the delicate trust among the three groups, meaning that the build, installation, and configuration procedures are still in tact. Having such assurance in check by mechanical means has made the three groups extremely effective in discovering issues during the development since it allowed each member to narrow down exactly what was responsible for the defects in a finely reduced time frame, which was in hours, rather than days or weeks.

Guardrail For Development

Having the automated package build process and the automated installation/configuration process in place at the early stage of the development was proven to be extremely useful; rather than agreeing on the written procedures, the dev, QA, and release team materialized such agreements into the actual implementation, and put them into work by using various automated mechanics that run on a daily basis. Therefore, throughout the development, we were able to witness and assure ourselves that we were making progress in accordance with the plan and our self-imposed restrictions.

Check out the Eucalyptus Open QA webpage to see the continuous integration at Eucalyptus in action:

Eucalyptus Open QA (beta) – http://ec2-50-112-61-121.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com/open_qa.php

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